Two Thousand And Fucking Fifteen - A Guide to Goal Setting

2015 Hayden Wilson Goal Setting Principles

 

Ahhh New Years.

Filled with those beautiful Facebook status' about "New Year, New You', 100's of PT's floggin' their 'special rates' and of course, good luck getting a bench when you go to the gym.

 

 

The truth of the matter is this lasts all of about 2 weeks.

 

 

Clients remember that they actually have to have dietary discipline to get results, they need to be consistent with their training and rest...and of course they need to actually pay to be with the expert. (that's you by the way)

 

 

The result? Only the strong survive.

 

 

I am a huge proponent for setting goals and getting busy working on hitting your targets every single day.  Below is a (nearly) bullet proof system for setting and achieving goals that I use and have helped many others implement as well.

 

 

You are the captain of your ship.  Take responsibility and steer it towards future happiness.

 

 

Enjoy.

 

 

Firstly, I want to explain how we can protect ourselves from a year of time that seems to fly by and preventing that feeling of; "JESUS, it's December already?....I'm still stuck doing X or still working for boss Y...When is it my time??"

 

 

To achieve the greatest version of you, it is a 5 stage process:

1. Setting S.M.A.R.T Goals.

2. Breaking down the goals into actionable steps.

3. Reviewing frequently.

4. Workout at them....HARD.

5. Learning to say no!

 

 

1. OK, let's be SMART about our goals.

 

I'm not generally one for bullshit acronyms and honestly think that certain people try and use acronyms to make themselves sounds smarter and like they've created a new system (when in fact there is very little new info, just re-wording).  But anyway, one particular acronym I actually do like, is all about setting what are called SMART goals:

 

S. Specific

M. Measurable

A. Achievable

R. Realistic

T. Timely

Here are the common examples of goal setting by most businesses:
- I'd like to lose weight
- We will make more money this year
- We are going to fill our diary with PT appointments

 

 

However here are some clear examples for SMART goals:

- I want to increase my payrate by 40% by June 2015

- I want to work with a strength specific coach to increase my deadlift by 60lbs over 3 months

- I want to progressively work at my content marketing to achieve a 15% increase in blog readership by March 2015.

 

 

So what can I do with this?

Take a look at the goals you have set for yourself this year.  Do they include each of the SMART elements?  Or are they simply like the above list of 'bad examples'?

 

 

Apart from the common problem of setting goals too small (ensuring that you will hit them and it not being a challenge) or goals too big (meaning you end up paralyzed and do nothing), is you don't have a plan to action of achieving them.  They sort of just loom and you hope for the best that everything falls into place and it just gets done, right?

 

 

I mean they're written down in a book/sheet of paper you're never going to read again.  Isn't that enough, Hayden!? (No it's not, you'll find out why throughout this article).

 

This brings us to point number 2,

 

 

2. Create an action guide.

 

When creating my goals document, I set aside a solid weekend.  2 hours here, 20 minutes there and a few hours more throughout.  I start a new Microsoft Word document and then each page will have a heading at the top with a new goal.  I've already finished the process of making it SMART, so at this point I am detailing the exact steps required to bring this into action.

 

 

Take the following example:

 

Goal: I want to increase the listener-ship of my podcast by 100% by Dec 2015.

 

 

How the hell to do this:

  1. Research new guests to come on the podcast
  2. Set aside time to contact these new guests
  3. Develop a script to explain my current reach, audience, demographics and more to entice the guest
  4. Record 40 new podcast over 2015
  5. Review statistics regularly (each month at least)

 

I will then literally make a table, print this off and carry this document with me everywhere.  (For real, it's on the desk next to me and picture below).  Each time I secure a new guest for my podcast, I write it on the sheet.  Seeing progress makes it A LOT easier to stay on track and monitor how far you've come.

 

goalspodcast

The next step (crucial) is to:

3. Review Frequently

Seriously, too many trainers, and people in general are not looking into exactly where they are, where they've been and where they are going.

Instead, it is more a matter of just flying by, and hoping for the best?

The only thing that this results in, is a another 'year' that flies by.

To truly review your goals, take each goal and ask yourself the following:

  • Which parts of the process have slowed me down so far?
  • Which processes could be improved meaning I have to work less for them, or, achieve a great result from current time input?
  • Are there tasks which I should NOT be doing? (simply because you suck at them? Note: requires brutal honesty)
  • Has there been feedback from others?  Has it been good or bad?

Every 3 months, spend 30 minutes - 1 hour reviewing the current goals you have in place.  Have you changed focus and some goals are no longer relevant?  Can you answer the above easily and without hesitation?

The next step is often forgotten about, but is obviously the most important of them all.  Trainers are especially known for neglecting this, especially once they start to see a bit of success and their diary fills up.

4. Working

Yes, that 7 letter word that seems to make certain people uncomfortable...but not you right?

You're a driven, passionate human being who can do anything right?

For a moment, I want you to forget about the studies that show saying "Studies have shown" is a bullshit way to start a sentence, and listen up:

Studies have shown that those who have little self awareness towards their own work often struggle to reach their goals.

- Those who claim they work hard, often have the most to say about it on Facebook.

- Those who outline their extremely busy schedule generally spin their wheels and burnout after 6 months of 10 hour training days (due to not investing enough time into their own business and simply just working away with no goal in mind)

The true sign of a hard worker is one who sets their goals, as outlined in point 1, sticks their head down, ass up and gets at it.  Not swaying, not complaining and certainly not stopping for a rest on weekends.

  • They work hard at getting results, and scream about them to everyone who will listen.
  • They invest in their future and education in order to create a better version of themselves.
  • They understand that in order to reach their own goals, they must constantly work at them, day in, day out, always moving forward and doing whatever is required.

*What's the source of this information? Taken from the study of my life, interviewing 45+ world class trainers, speaking with and helping trainers every single day, and spending time with some extremely successful people in all industries. (Including one of my newest mentors/personal coaches, who just sold his company for a cool $65 million).

Lastly, the most successful trainers and industry professionals that I have worked with and personally interviewed follow this last principle religiously:

5. They know when to say No...

This isn't about being an asshole or about knocking back great opportunities.  It is about having the balls to determine exactly which projects you need to concentrate on, which projects to jump on board with and which projects to park for a later date.

The difficult thing about this point is you will need to make a call each time something new presents itself.....You will need courage and commitment.

This is called opportunity cost.  What you give up in order to get something else.
For example: If you bring in 10 hours of new business, that is 10 hours less of business development work that you can do or 10 hours less than you can allocate to learning or reading.  Sure it is nice to get 10 hours of new business for most people, but this then creates the problem of less time to work on your own business, less time to spend with your family and less time to participate in activities aligned closely with your goals.

To make a decision (note how how I didn't say right or wrong), will require a deeper understanding of where you want your business to go, well beyond 12 months.  Where do you want your business to be in 12 months time, 3-5 years time, 10 years time.  Will you still be around?

I certainly hope so.

So before we part, ask yourself the following question:
How can I set myself apart, make a bigger impact on the world and become a KILLER in 2015?
The answer is in between your ears.

 

Cheers.

Hayden